Tag Archives: International Space Station

Space Station: Wonder ABOVE World

December 6, 1998 — fifteen years ago — humanity started construction on our human outpost, the International Space Station. Fifteen countries put aside cultural and political differences to join forces to create humanity’s greatest engineering feat. We built each section of Station in orbit. Pretty amazing, don’t you think? And when we plugged everything in (so to speak), it worked! Not at all like my experience with stringing Christmas lights.

To celebrate the 15th anniversary, here are a few pics of Station through the years — from infancy to maturity. Enjoy.

Space Station 2011

Space Station 2011

Space Station 2010

Space Station 2010

Space Station 2010

Space Station 2010

Space Station 2010 (Shadow of Space Shuttle Endeavour)

Space Station 2010 (Shadow of Space Shuttle Endeavour)

Space Station 2009

Space Station 2009

Space Station 2009 (Can you find Endeavour's shadow?)

Space Station 2009 (Can you find Endeavour’s shadow?)

Space Station 2009

Space Station 2009

Space Station 2008

Space Station 2008

Space Station 2008

Space Station 2008

Space Station 2008

Space Station 2008

Space Station 2007

Space Station 2007

Space Station 2007

Space Station 2007. Can you see Endeavour’s shadow?

Space Station 2007

Space Station 2007

Space Station 2007

Space Station 2007

Space Station 2007

Space Station 2007

Space Station 2006

Space Station 2006

Space Station 2006

Space Station 2006

Space Station 2005

Space Station 2005

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Space Station 2002

Space Station 2002

Space Station 2002

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Space Station 2002

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Space Station 2002

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Space Station 2001

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Space Station 2001

Space Station 2001

Space Station 2001

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Space Station 1998

Space Station 1998

Space Station 1998

Space Station 1998

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How Home Ownership is like Space Travel

Home ownership, for me, is a series of duct-tape moments. I can never seem to stay on top of everything that breaks. Those of you who follow me on Twitter know I have home ownership issues. You may recall my Door Jam Saga last year.

Yesterday was a duct-tape day for me.

Roll of Duct Tape

It all started when I opened the door to the built-in microwave oven. The door handle splintered. Really? I just replaced the refrigerator, which quit working. I can’t afford a new microwave at this moment, so I fished out my trusty roll of white duct tape, and taped the handle back together.

Microwave Broken Handle

For the casual observer, you wouldn’t know it’s broken. The white duct tape really blends in well. But my mother is staying with me, so I had to label it with a hot pink stickie note, “Handle broken,” alerting her to open with care.

Sigh, this gives me some breathing room until I get a new microwave. I open the door to the kitchen cabinet under the microwave to put my handy dandy duct tape away (I keep it in the kitchen to solve all my problems) and guess what, the door came off at the hinges. The hinge actually broke and took a chunk of the cabinet door with it.

Seriously?

Broken HingeI get out my electric screwdriver and take out the old hinge. I try my best to duct tape it back together. No dice. So, I grab my coat and and head out to the nearest Lowe’s to find a suitable hinge replacement. Turns out, this hinge is a special 120-degree door hinge. All the other hinges are meant for 90-degree cabinet doors. The friendly guys at Lowe’s tell me to go online and see if I can find one.

Yay.

I head back home and spend the rest of the evening trying to make-do with one less hinge and a missing door chunk. My fix involved some creative duct-tape solutions. Oh, and another hot pink stickie telling my mother to “handle” with care.

Broken Cabinet Door

While I was duct-taping, I was thinking: what will life be like for humans who travel past low Earth orbit for long-distance human spaceflight?

What do you think will happen when we set up human outposts farther than a hop, skip, and jump from this planet? I envision duct-tape moments will be their norm. Just like remote locations here on Earth, where resupply is scarce. We humans are resourceful. We use what we have at our fingertips to make ends meet.

I picture long-distance space travel will look more like the Matrix.

Matrix movie pic

Our shiny new spacecraft and provisions won’t look shiny and new for long. Part of the learning experience on the Russian Mir and the International Space Station is to sustain human life in the remote extreme environment 220 miles over our heads. We’re still close enough for rescue and resupply. The further we venture out, the harder mission support becomes.

Our most dramatic duct-tape moment may be the STS-120 cuff link fix for the solar arrays on Space Station. Flight Day 8 in the mission, we noticed a separation in one of the solar arrays.

Damaged Space Station solar array

Teams on the ground worked with the Space Station and STS-120 crews in orbit to fashion a fix, called the cuff link, out of existing material onboard the spacecraft. Below is Astronaut George Zamka holding NASA’s solution.

On Flight Day 12, Astronaut Scott Parazynski attached himself to the end of the very long boom of the Space Shuttle Discovery (which is currently in orbit for her final flight at the very moment), and attached the cuff link to the solar panel to hold it in place. All while the solar panels continue to collect energy from the sun. Quite dangerous. Quite amazing.

Scott Parazynski repairing Space Station solar array: Credit: NASA

A true duct-tape moment of human ingenuity.

I expect to see so many more creative and heroic moments in the future of this planet’s exploration of the heavens above. But for a moment, let’s get back to the subject of home ownership, shall we? Did I mention the clogged toilet from last weekend? I admit, no amount of duct tape is going to fix that problem. I called a plumber.

But when you live in space, you ARE the plumber. At times like these, I’m glad I’m not a space pioneer. Some skills, I’d rather not attempt. Space toilet repair is one of them. Though we have many stories to tell along those [clogged] lines too. Not today, though. I’m sticking with duct tape! ;)

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Filed under astronaut, innovation, NASA, space, technology

Flat Stanley: Out of this World Tour

Guest Post by Stanley Lambchop

Hi! My name is Flat Stanley. I belong to Nathan Woolverton, Beth Beck’s adorable nephew. Nathan’s class has an assignment to send me on an adventure. I’ve always wanted to go to space, so I asked if Nathan’s aunt Beth would take me to work with her. She works at NASA, you know. So, Nathan’s mom popped me into a mailer and here I am. I’m flat, you see, so I don’t cost much in postage to get from Texas to DC.

"Flat Stanley" book by Jeff Brown, 1964

"Flat Stanley" book by Jeff Brown, 1964

Beth told me you might not know who I am. Really? Wow. I guess I better tell you a little about myself. I was born in 1964. My real name is Stanley Lambchop. My younger brother is Arthur. My dad gave me a bulletin board that fell on my bed, squashing me flat. Hey. Don’t worry. It’s not as bad as it sounds. I kinda like it. I’ll never grow bigger or older than I am now. How cool is that?!? AND, I can slip inside an envelop, fax or email to go ANYwhere I want. I’m getting to see much of the world.

But Nathan is special. He sent me on an out-of-this-world adventure. I dare you to top this! I’ve been sending Nathan email pics of my adventure. I have to write a journal too, so Beth thought a guest blogpost would let all of you enjoy my incredible experience. Now my class journal can be a virtual learning tool. Note: In case you’re wondering, I’m dictating my comments to Beth. I haven’t quite mastered typing on a keyboard with my flat fingers.

Fellow Earthings, prepare to get VERY jealous.

First of all, you should know that the weather in DC is very cold, icy and snowy in the winter. But while I’ve been up here, Nathan and his class have seen two snowstorms. Quite amazing — since he lives in warm sunny Texas. We had to shovel our way out before Beth and I could drive to work. We were both sweating inside our snow clothes. It’s hard work!

Flat Stanley in DC snow

Washington DC: I helped shovel snow.

The U.S. Office of Personnel Management allowed federal government workers to telework or take vacation time off — just to keep thousands of drivers off the snowy roads. Beth had a meeting, so we drove in to work together. You know NASA is a government agency, right?

Here I am at NASA!

Flat Stanley Visits NASA

Here I am at NASA! Woot!

I came to visit on an important day, NASA’s Day of Remembrance, when NASA honors fallen heroes who’ve given their lives to the cause of exploration.

Flat Stanley: NASA Day of Remembrance

I learned about NASA's Day of Remembrance.

I toured the building. I found astronaut Deke Slayton’s spacesuit right down the hall from where Beth works. Deke was was one of the original NASA Mercury Seven astronauts, selected in 1959 (before I was born). He was the only member of the Mercury Seven not to fly. He was grounded because of a problem with his heart, but he ended up flying in space in 1975 with the Apollo-Soyuz test Project — the first time the U.S and Soviet Union worked together in space.

Astronaut Deke Slayton's spacesuit.

Here I am with Astronaut Deke Slayton's spacesuit.

I met Robonaut Centaur. Pretty cool dude. He rolls around on a rover base. He’ll help astronauts who are working on the surface of another planet. He’s kin to Robonaut 2, robo-humanoid STS-133 crewmember launching to Space Station on February 24.

Flat Stanley meets Robonaut Centaur

I met Robonaut Centaur, cousin to STS-133 Robonaut2.

Here I am hangin’ with my new peeps, the RoboTwins: Robonaut 2 and Robonaut 2. They were duking it out over who gets to launch onboard STS-133 Space Shuttle Discovery on one of the final missions in the Shuttle program, scheduled for February 24.

Flat Stanley with his peeps: Robonaut 2 Twins

Hangin with my peeps: RoboTwins

I inspected a Space Shuttle up close and personal. It’s really high way up at the top. Check it out!

Flat Stanley's Tank Top View

Here's my Tank Top View. Original photo by NASA's Bill Ingals.

Here’s what a bird would see when a Space Shuttle launches. Pretty amazing, don’t you think? I can’t believe we’ll only have three more launches EVER in the history of mankind.

Flat Stanley sees a Space Shuttle launch

Only three more Space Shuttle launches EVer!

The only way off this planet, until we come up with another solution, is by rocket propulsion. “Beam me up, Scotty” only works on TV and in movies, sadly. Hopefully some of you out there will come up with a cool new mode of transportation, like dream transport or spacial folding techniques. (I just made those up, but who can predict what breakthrough might happen in the future.)

Once we get off the planet, though, we can see sights like these. Come along for the rocket ride.

Flat Stanley visits International Space Station

Isn't Space Station amazing?

The International Space Station orbits 220 miles over Earth, circling the globe every 90 minutes at a speed of 17,500 mph with a international crew of six.

Flat Stanley tours Space Station

Another view of Space Station.

Flat Stanley on Top of the World

Flat Stanley on Top of the World

Flat Stanley on the Moon: Nope. No cheese!

Moon tour: Nope. No cheese!

Flat Stanley scorched by Sun

Sun: Man, this place is HOT!

Flat Stanley: Mars

Mars, the Red Planet. Humans could live here in the future.

When humans travel beyond Earth’s atmosphere, they need protection from the harsh environment of space. Either a spaceship or spacesuit — to provide air, cooling and heating, and other essentials. Our atmosphere provides a radiation shield, but once we go further out, we need to provide protection. On the planet’s surface, whether Moon or Mars, we’ll need a hardshelled suit, like the one I tried on. But I don’t think it fits. Do you?

Flat Stanley tries on Mars suit

I'm trying on the Mars suit. It's a bit big.

Maybe someday we’ll have bio-shields or exo-skins that protect us without a spacesuit. Maybe Nathan and his classmates will come up with a technology breakthrough that NASA can use.

Highlight of my visit: I met a real live astronaut! Really. I promise. Not only is Leland Melvin a spaceman, he’s also the Chief of Education at NASA. He really likes kids. You can tell. He stopped a meeting to pose for a picture with me. Cool dude!

Flat Stanley meets astronaut Leland Melvin

Here I am with astronaut Leland Melvin!

Leland spent over 565 hours in space during two Space Shuttle missions: STS-122 in 2008 and STS-129 in 2009. He also played football in the NFL with the Detroit Lions in 1986, as well as the Dallas Cowboys and Toronto Argonauts, until injuries kept him off the field. Good thing for NASA. Don’t you think?

Maybe someday I’ll go live on Mars. I don’t weigh much. I don’t eat anything. I don’t need radiation protection, or even a spacesuit, for that matter. If Robonaut can be part of a space crew, I think a flat boy should have the chance. Leland and I are buds now. Maybe he can put in a good word for me. Hmmm.

I hope you liked my space adventure. I learned alot about NASA. I hope you did too.

Oh, and you can Facebook me, if you want. I have my own page. But for now, I need to get back to Nathan’s class. Time for me to get into the mailer, so Beth can get me to the post office. When I get back to Texas, I’m going to make sure Nathan asks his mom to let me watch live views from Space Station on the NASA TV channel on the web. You can too.

Flat Stanley & NASA's Alien

NASA discovered alien life after all!

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Filed under federal government, NASA, space

NASA Solves Problems Above AND Below Earth

A team from NASA’s Langley Research Center, led by Clint Cragg, helped design the escape pod to rescue 33 Chilean miners trapped 2,300 feet below the surface since August 5.

“Putting teams together and getting the best talent from across the agency, that’s what we’re pretty good at.” Clint Cragg

Chilean officials turned to NASA for expertise in dealing with humans who live and work in confined spaces (though Space Station is now the size of a five bedroom house with two bathrooms, a gym, and office/lab space). Not too shabby.

Clint Cragg's pic from Chile

Rescue site in Copiapo, Chile. Credit: Clint Cragg

Clint, along with NASA doctors Michael Duncan and J.D. Polk, and psychologist Al Holland, met with officials in Chile to consider options. Back at home, Clint pulled together a tiger team to look at extraction capsule designs, which contributed to the final design.

I have to say: watching the miners lifted to safety, one by one, on their journey to family and fresh air, feels like a testament to the Gene KranzFailure in Not an Option” mentality that the Apollo 13 movie made famous.

NASA's Gene Kranz

NASA's Gene Kranz

The human spirit is infinitely resourceful.

I think NASA embodies the limitless nature of what we can accomplish if we bring the right minds and attitudes to the table. We solve problems…against all odds. Today, we see evidence that we not only tackle challenges off the planet, but below the surface as well. How cool is that?

Bravo Clint and NASA team. You guys ROCKet!

And welcome back to the land of sunshine, miners of Chile. Breathe deeply. Today is a new day!

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Filed under Earth, humanitarian aid, leadership, NASA, space, technology

Every Ending = New Beginning

In the mid-90’s, I recall a conversation with German Space Agency liaison, Gerhart Brauer — both a colleague and good friend to me. I struggled with a painful chapter in my life, and Gerhart offered this one simple phrase that made all the difference at the time. And even today.

Every ending is a new beginning.

Sometimes, though, this concept can be hard to accept. Personally and professionally. Take the end of our beloved Space Shuttle program, for example. Only three flights left. EVER!

Shuttle Stack

Shuttle Stack

My sister Aimee recently reminded me how she and Daddy watched Columbia lift off on April 12, 1981. She remembers him marveling that we could actually launch a rocket from Earth and fly it back to the planet like an airplane. The concept was so unbelievable at the time.

We take it for granted today.

I don’t recall the launch at all. But, I remember the STS-1 landing two days later. I worked at the University of Texas Ex-Students’ Association in Austin. We gathered around the conference table to watch Columbia land. I remember how cool it was to meet STS-1 John Young and Bob Crippin for the first time a few years later. They were the first humans to put their lives on the line and strap themselves onto the Shuttle stack for launch.

But then again, every astronaut who has ever flown on a rocket ship takes a leap of faith — each time we ignite the engines.

Yes, the fleet of amazing reusable winged vehicles served us well over the last three decades (with the exception of our tragic loss of the Challenger and Columbia crew and vehicles on two missions: STS-51-L and STS-107). We don’t relish mothballing the remaining three vehicles: Atlantis, Discovery and Endeavour. But think about the exorbitant cost of upgrades. Cost alone makes the close-out decision for NASA managers so much easier than for those on the outside looking in.

Orbiter Cutaway

Orbiter Cutaway

Let’s face it, many of us are mourning the end of the program. And that’s ok. Grief is a reasonable human response. We love to watch our winged vehicles soar into the air, breaking gravity’s grasp on humanity. Those of us fortunate enough to witness a Shuttle launch live, love to feel the ground-shaking rumble and the roar of the engines. Some have even seen the night-sky turn to day as the vehicle propels to the heavens above.

 

STS-131 launch

STS-131 launch

 

It’s a bird! It’s a plane! No, it’s a Space Shuttle!!!

(Sorry Superman. We’ve got the real thing. You’re only fiction.)

So what happens next? What follows the Space Shuttle program? So many ask. Many are angry and confused. I don’t have the answers. Just know that NASA folks are furiously working to fill in the blanks. (We’ll fly on Soyuz spacecraft to Station in the meantime.) Beyond that, stay tuned. No comfort for thousands of workers who made house payments, put food on the table, and paid school expenses off Shuttle-related paychecks. I get it. My heart goes out to them. This post-Shuttle “new beginning” must feel like a black hole, where everything they know is disappearing into a powerful vortex outside their control. NASA has been planning this for years, but it doesn’t make the end of the program any easier.

We humans don’t like change, do we?

It’s uncomfortable. Messy, at times. We often prefer the certainty of misery over the misery of uncertainty. That’s why we stay in dead-end jobs or in joyless relationships. We’re funny like that. When change comes, we fight it, dig in our heels, complain to anyone who will listen. Does that sound at all familiar?

But with every new beginning, comes new hope for a better tomorrow.

If we can only let go of those things we cling tightly to, we might have two arms free to embrace this scary, unknown new thing — sometimes called a fresh start.

Here are a few ways to face change head on. Our Goal: Influence Change!

  1. Think creatively.
  2. Use the same tools in new ways.
  3. Find new tools to make old ways new.
  4. Look at a problem upside down and right side up.
  5. Deconstruct to reconstruct.
  6. Make change your own.
  7. Sculpt your world into something better than ever existed before.

Who knows, you might like tomorrow better than today! Really, it could happen. ;)

STS-132

STS-132

 

BTW: The next launch, STS-132, is scheduled for May 14. We’ll be having our second Shuttle Launch tweetup at the Kennedy Space Center and a mission tweetup at the Johnson Space Center. Stay-tuned for stories about the launch and space tweeps I meet there.

If you have stories to share about where you were and how you felt with the first Space Shuttle left Earth, feel free to post them as comments. I’d love to read them.

Crosspost on OpenNASA.com and GovLoop.com.

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Filed under Earth, leadership, NASA, social media, space, tweet-up

Eating Earth Dust (for NASA)

After two days on the National Mall with the NASA exhibit to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Earth Day, I can literally say I’ve become a dust-of-the-Earth kinda’ gal. The saying “ashes to ashes” (volcano ash), “dust to dust” (dust tornados to be precise) holds new meaning for me this week. I feel Mother Earth trying to claim me as her own this week. Fitting, I guess, for Earth Day week.

Cold, sand-blasted, wind-whipped  — but great space conversations.

Planet Earth art sculpture on National Mall

Planet Earth art sculpture on National Mall

"Plant It" Earth art sculpture on National Mall

"Plant It" Earth art sculpture on National Mall

Capitol behind Earth sculpture.

Capitol behind Earth sculpture.

NASA participated in the Earth Day Network celebration with tents and activities on the Mall. We brought a flown Space Shuttle tire for visitors to sign and decorate. We’re recycling the tire to let folks touch something that’s actually flown in space, and leave their “mark on space” by signing/doodling on the tire.

Flown Shuttle tire on Saturday.

Flown Shuttle tire on Saturday.

Graffiti Tire AND Display on Sunday

Graffiti Tire AND Display on Sunday

Yep, we love to leave our mark on history — as you can see.

We also took our Spacesuit Photo Op display out to the Mall for visitors to step inside for a spacesuit portrait. Always fun for Earthlings of all ages.

(We can even show proof of space cooperation with the Chinese…Panda bears, that is.)

Even Panda Bears love space!

Even Panda Bears love space!

Space boy

Maybe he'll walk on Mars one day.

NASA's Vickie Walton staffs Photo Op Spacesuit.

NASA's Vickie Walton staffs Photo Op Spacesuit.

Hannah (in stripes) LOVES all things space! Girl power!

Hannah (in stripes) LOVES all things space! Girl power!

We held our first-ever Earth tweet-up yesterday. I don’t work in the Earth science program at NASA, but cool that I was working the Mall exhibit and had the chance to chat with Space Tweeps all day. Serendipity for me. Except that while I talked to Tweeps, people signed the Shuttle Tire DISPLAY holder, rather than the tire itself.

NASA's first Earth Day Tweet-up

NASA's first Earth Day Tweet-up

Space Tweep @astroIvy

Space Tweep @astroIvy

My space tweep buddy Glenn @zippyG2

My space tweep buddy Glenn @zippyG2

Space laughs with @cmaaarrr + @moonrangerlaura

Space laughs with @cmaaarrr + @moonrangerlaura

@oceanChick99 interviewing Maria-Jose @theAGU for UnanimousMovie.com

Tina @oceanChick99 interviewing Maria-Jose @theAGU for UnanimousMovie.com

Manoel Belem

Manoel Belem

I really enjoyed meeting Manoel Belem, astronaut-candidate in Brazil — back when they were partnering with us on the International Space Station. Manoel flew here from São Paulo JUST for the NASA Tweet-up. Manoel shared with us about Brazil’s first astronaut Marcos Pontes who trained with the astronauts in Houston, before his country made the decision to fly him to space through the Russian space tourist program. Marcos launch with the Expedition-13 crew from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on March 29, 2006 and spent eight days in space. Brazil shut down the astronaut program, leaving Manoel without a flight to space. He’s still dreaming of the day he fulfills his zero-g dream. In the meantime, he’s active in social media as @mlbelem.

Great conversations with all of you! But, I have to say, the highlight for me was holding @astroIvy’s iPad in my very own hands. I so SO want one!

Browse the Earth Day pics the Science Mission Directorate posted on Flickr. (The Earth dome in the Flickr pictures blew over. We’re hoping Mother Earth calms down during the week so we can pitch the tent again.)

We’ll be on the Mall all week through next weekend. Come learn more about NASA and space, if you’re in town. (And dress for winter!)

Hill staffer @KenMonroe shows off green NASA bag.

Hill staffer @KenMonroe shows off green NASA bag.

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Filed under artists, Earth, environment, federal government, NASA, social media, space, tweet-up

Nobel Peace Prize Orbits Earth

When NASA’s Alan Ladwig spoke at the International Space University Symposium, “Public Face on Space,” he suggested the International Space Station partnership deserved the Nobel Peace Prize.

What an absolutely BRILLIANT idea!

Orbiting Outpost

Nobel-deserving International Orbiting Outpost

Think about it. Space agencies  in the United States, Europe, Canada and Japan worked together for years planning an orbiting laboratory in space. After the fall of the iron curtain, Russia — a former adversary — joined the partnership. Unprecedented. Our Cold War rival now our friend?

Our quest to move beyond the boundaries of Earth’s atmosphere lifted us high above political, cultural and language barriers that divide us on the surface of this planet.

15 nations came together IN PEACE to design, build, launch, and assemble our orbiting outpost — 22o miles overhead 24/7 orbiting every 90  minutes at 17,500 mph.

15 countries came together to build the International Space Station

Senior government officials from 15 countries agreed to partnership.

Here is a portrait of senior government officials from our international partner countries who came to Washington D.C.  on Jan. 29, 1998 to establish the framework of cooperation upon with the partnership was formed — representatives of Russia, Japan, Canada, and participating countries of the European Space Agency (ESA), including Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.

And it wasn’t easy. Just ask anyone who worked in the Space Station program.

I was actually hired to come work in the Space Station program back in 1985. At the time, Station was but a series of drawings, hopes and dreams — not to mention crossed fingers. In a staff meeting not long ago, Bill Gerstenmaier made a comment during a Space Shuttle mission that really struck me. He told us how amazed he was that all the assembly details that kept him up at night over the years came together flawlessly. It’s pretty incredible that we assembled ON ORBIT all the hardware, cables, and software built at locations all around the world by workers in multiple languages.

So what about Alan’s  Peace Prize idea? How would that work? Curious, I looked up the Nobel Peace Prize nomination process. You may not be surprised to learn that only a select few can submit proposals. No self-nominations. Snap.

According to the Nobel Prize website:

The Norwegian Nobel Committee is responsible for the selection of eligible candidates and the choice of the Nobel Peace Prize Laureates. The Committee is composed of five members appointed by the Storting (Norwegian parliament). The Nobel Peace Prize is awarded in Oslo, Norway, not in Stockholm, Sweden, where the Nobel Prizes in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature and the Economics Prize are awarded.

Nobel Peace Prize process

Nobel Peace Prize process-- Credit: NobelPrize.org

So, from what I can tell, we have until September. We need to find a qualified nominator who believes the Space Station international partnership — that successfully designed, built, launched, assembled, and continues to operate our amazing Peace Laboratory in Low Earth Orbit — is worthy of nomination. Right?

Peace signHey, what about our Norwegian partners? Surely they have qualified friends, wouldn’t you think? If you know anyone who fits the bill, give them a shout for us. You can help us spread the good word – two words, actually: Peace Prize!

It’s amazingly noble — this international partnership in space. Why shouldn’t it be Nobel too?

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Filed under Earth, federal government, leadership, NASA, space