Words Make a Difference

I’ve been thinking about the power of words, spoken and written. Spoken words can uplift and tear down, they can burrow deeply inside to flourish or fester. I’m so thankful for parents who encouraged me to be me — even when the world disagreed. Daddy gave me song, laughter, and a wild imagination. Mother gave me music in written word — which evoked colors and smells and images and emotions that stretched and shaped me.

Every time I smell the cheerful brightness of a freshly peeled orange, I picture myself as a 3rd grader sick in bed with something horrible. Mother brought me orange slices, sat by my bed, and read the adventures of Hitty and the girls who loved her for a hundred years.

"Hitty Her First Hundred Years" by Rachel Fields, Adapted by Rosemary Wells and Illustrated by Susan Jeffers.

“Hitty: Her First Hundred Years” by Rachel Fields, adapted by Rosemary Wells, illustrated by Susan Jeffers

I have some of the books from my childhood, though not my original Hitty. I picked up this adapted and updated version at a SCBWI conference a few years back. After attending the SCBWI winter conference, I dug up some of the books that influenced my childhood. I have a few to share with you.

Pretty Penny — I loved this book for it’s vibrant colors. I have a guest bedroom this color. Funny to trace the roots of my love for color back to books from childhood.

Pretty Penny the Pig: Story and Illustrations by Beverly Morgan

Pretty Penny the Pig: Story and Illustrations by Beverly Morgan

Here’s a book called Books. The illustrations are wacky and colorful — opening the possibilities of what words can create.

"Books" by Murry McCain & Illustrated by John Alcorn

“Books” by Murry McCain & Illustrated by John Alcorn

Hailstones and Halibut Bones is a book in rhyme inspired by color. Each page has a color theme. Each room in my house is painted a different color: my living room is yellow, my office is lime green, my bedroom is blue, the guest room is pink, my bathroom is green/yellow/pink/blue to match the Mackensie-Childs sink and tiles.

"Hailstones and Halibut Bones: Adventures in Color" by Mary O'Neill and Illustrated by Leonard Weisgard

“Hailstones and Halibut Bones: Adventures in Color” by Mary O’Neill and Illustrated by Leonard Weisgard

I loved poetry, as a kid. I have many dog-eared pages from the Treasure Chest of Poetry. So many dreams of mine, sketched out in rhyme.😉

"A Treasure Chest of Poetry"

“A Treasure Chest of Poetry”

“Little Things” by Ebenezer Cobham Brewer

LIttle drops of water,

Little grains of sand, 

Make the mighty ocean

and the pleasant land.

Thus the little minutes,

Humble though they be,

Make the mighty ages

Of eternity.

Lona is one of my favorite books from Mother. I still love Lona. I trace back my fascination with pinhole photography to this book by photographer Dare Wright. I still have the original with my sister’s drawings on the pages. We’re twelve years apart. She and I fought over this book a few years back. I won.

"Lona: A Fairy Tale" by Dare Wright

“Lona: A Fairy Tale” by Dare Wright

When Sara Smiled is about a girl with violet eyes who is too shy to talk to boys, but feels totally comfortable talking to horses. She spoke to me when I was younger. I SO wanted her violet eyes to go with my blond hair. I also wanted the horse and the boy in the book…. I don’t know how many times I read this book and dreamed of violet-eyed romance.

"When Sara Smiled" by Kathleen Robinson

“When Sara Smiled” by Kathleen Robinson

What’s missing in my collection? Little Women! I’m pretty sure I still have my original…tucked away somewhere. I just can’t put my hands on it. Beth dies [spoiler alert] which I hated, since we share the same name. But Jo was my hero. I composed my own newspapers and stories, like Jo. Also, Wuthering Heights. My Senior year in high school, I loved it. Re-reading it now, I’m horrified by the dysfunction. But at that time in my life, I was reeling from the loss of my best friend. I think the tale of dark, obsessive love appealed to what was broken in me. The Bible, my lifetime favorite book, healed the brokenness, so I’m back to the my happy world of butterflies, flowers, and rainbows.

Thank you Mother for sharing the written word with me. You always made me feel special. You awoke stories and colors in me. Or perhaps they were already there, and you helped me find them.

Handwritten Note inside "Books" by Murray McCain

Note inside “Books” by Murray McCain

What books influenced you growing up? Do you have them still?

 

4 Comments

Filed under writers

4 responses to “Words Make a Difference

  1. Victor Moraees

    A book that influenced me Beth, was “The Little Prince”.

  2. Mum always loved books, so our home is like a library with all kinds of books. I read Little Women and one book I think of when I go back to childhood is Ivanohe by Sir Walter Scott. I was keen about friendship (Sei Piccole Amiche – Peter Holeinone) and fairylands books. Plus, The Happy Prince And Other Stories by Oscar Wilde.

  3. Beth,
    The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein. This childhood favorite helps guide me through crossroads and has been a constant reminder, that giving is an altruistic endeavor that keeps the world growing. Each time I read the book it’s meaning changes depending on where I am in my life. It’s strong message about selfless giving brought me to the world’s first school solely dedicated to giving, Indiana University’s Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. I remember when I saw the school’s banner for the first time, (which displays a shield with a growing plant that sprouts leaves) I knew I made the right decision. I would not be where I am today without the simple story of the relationship of a boy in need and a selfless tree.

  4. All my Nancy Drew books..and other “detective” like ones. They inspired me to think about logic, cause and effect, seeing what’s not there, reading people, etc. But mostly these were my virtual female role models. Strong women who were admired for being smart.

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