Category Archives: Gov 2.0

Castles and Foundation Stones

“If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.” Henry David Thoreau

Karlstejn Castle outside Prague: home of the Holy Roman Empire.

Karlstejn Castle outside Prague: home of the Holy Roman Empire.

Debbie Weil came to NASA recently to interview me for a book she’s writing about Social Media and the over 50 crowd — and yes, I totally fit into her demographic. She asked how we’d been able to make such headway at NASA with a number of groundbreaking projects.

My answer: by doing all the hard work to put solid foundations in place to support them.

UK Appleby Castle Knight. Copyright 2002 Beth Beck

UK Appleby Castle Knight. Copyright 2002 Beth Beck

Sometimes the best tool for breaking new ground is a pickax. Sometimes it involves diplomacy. Sometimes it requires creative negotiations. Most often it requires stubborn determination and an extremely thick skin. Body armor comes in handy too — for all the slings and arrows of opposition.

“To be, or not to be, that is the question:
Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer
the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles
and by opposing end them.” — Shakespeare’s Hamlet

Making dreams come true takes a good deal of sweat, blood and tears. Ask any entrepreneur how many hours he or she works, or how many ideas crashed and burned along the way.

Sometimes putting the legal, budget, and procurement processes in place to create a project seems to take longer than necessary. Yes, it usually does. That’s what Red Tape is all about. But the fact that we get anything through the federal bureaucracy at all can be nothing short of a miracle. So rejoice when we make it through to the other side. Cobbling together political will to make change happen can be exhausting as well, but it’s absolutely, positively essential for success of any new project.

Foundation building is grueling, hard work — whether it means digging deep into the rock, or building up stone by stone, block by block. Better the house built on rock than one built on shifting sand.

“But everyone who hears these words of mine and does not put them into practice is like a foolish man who built his house on sand.  The rain came down, the streams rose, and the winds blew and beat against that house, and it fell with a great crash.” Matthew 23-27

So whether you’re building solid foundations of character or projects, my hat’s off to you. I’ll be right there beside you, slugging it out to make this world a better place.

Here’s to castles in the air, and the foundations that keep them there!

 

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Filed under culture, federal government, Gov 2.0, LAUNCH, leadership, NASA, social media

Adaptors vs. Innovators: Kirton Inventory as Gov 2.0 Predictor?

Anke Domscheit-Berg ignited a gender fire storm yesterday with her GovLoop blogpost: “Why do women understand government 2.0 and social media better than men?”

My good buddy and LAUNCH: Health teammate, Todd Khozein, sent me an email yesterday with the link. I read the post and left a comment, then tweeted out the link. I received these comments back:

@edwardvirtually tweet about gender differences

@califgirl232 tweet about women and Gov 2.0

@genejm29 tweet

@edwardvirtually tweet

Interesting conversation about whether women are better suited to embrace Gov 2.0 tools. Personally, I love social media tools, but I work with women who don’t. I’ve learned a great deal about Gov 2.0 from incredibly gifted progressive guys at NASA, but watched many more snub their noses at it. I think it goes both ways.

Though gender may give insight into how men and women approach situations differently, we may find a less contentious Gov 2.0 cheerleader-meter.

The Kirton Adaptation-Innovation Inventory may just be the PERFECT tool to flush out change agents.

The Kirton Inventory measures problem-solving and creativity in individuals and helps teams understand the different ways they approach solutions. I first learned of the Kirton Inventory back in the 1990s when I planned an off-site retreat for the Office of Policy and Plans (better known as the Land of MisFit Toys) led by Lori Garver. We brought in a facilitator who tested us, then walked us through how our Kirton scores would help Lori make smart team assignments.

The Kirton Inventory scores individuals on a continuum from Adaptors to Innovators. The Adaptors work best within the existing system, seeing change as a matter of  tweaking and perfecting what already exists. The Innovators embrace all things new and adapt quickly to change.

Kirton Inventory: Characteristics of Adaptors & Innovators

Characteristics of Adaptors & Innovators. Credit: "Chemical Innovation" Nov 2001

At the extreme ends of either side of the spectrum, the Adaptors find comfort in the status quo where the Innovators prefer tossing out the old and starting fresh. Neither side can speak the language of the other, and need translators — who are the individuals who scored somewhere in the middle of the spectrum. These individuals are called the “Bridge” because they can speak both languages: status quo and change.

Our facilitator advised that every team needed at least one Bridge to keep the process moving, otherwise miscommunication and misunderstandings could impede progress.

alienMy Kirton Inventory scores qualified me as an extreme innovator. Surprised? 😉 Most of my workmates scored on the opposite end of the spectrum as Adaptors, and some as extreme Adaptors. I began to understand for the first time why I felt like an alien at NASA. My Innovator-DNA hadn’t equipped me to relate, understand, or communicate with “the Adaptors.”

According to an article about the Kirton Inventory Tool in “Chemical Innovation: Can corporate innovation champions survive?” Nov 2001…

Extreme Innovators describe Extreme Adaptors as:

  • dogmatic,
  • compliant,
  • stuck in a rut,
  • timid,
  • conforming, and
  • inflexible.

Extreme Adaptors describe Extreme Innovators as:

  • Unsound
  • impractical,
  • abrasive,
  • undisciplined
  • insensitive,
  • one who loves to create confusion.

I’ve heard many of these words used to describe me — abrasive, impractical, chaos-creator. Yep, the story of my 25 years at NASA.

Back to the original question: Does an affinity for change (think Gov 2.0) have anything to do with gender, as described in Anke’s thought-provoking blogpost? Are Innovators or Adaptors pushed to the extremes through influences or factors linked to DNA, socialization, gender, or experiences? The Kirton Inventory doesn’t address the causes behind the scores, so I can’t answer the question. I can only offer another data point for the discussion.

I have an idea! Why don’t you take the Kirton test yourself? See if you’re an Adaptor or Innovator. Let me know what you find out.

But if you’re an Adaptor, remember to bring your translator with you. Otherwise, I might not understand a word you say.

Crosspost on GovLoop.

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Filed under federal government, Gov 2.0, govloop, leadership, NASA, social media

Space Buzz: The New High!

The 18th annual SXSW Interactive Festival in Austin, Texas will be held on March 11-15, 2011. They bill the event as “five days of compelling presentations from the brightest minds in emerging technology, scores of exciting networking events hosted by industry leaders.” Potential presenters submit panel session proposals, which are sifted and selected for voting.

I’ve never been to SXSW, but I’ve wanted to go for years. Now is the time, I hope — with your help.

Our panel “Space Buzz: The New High” has been selected for consideration by YOU. You’ll have to sign up for an account, then you can vote and comment. Our panel will explore NASA’s social media conversation, specifically how to create and collect the buzz.

Come visit us in the NASA Buzzroom to see what the buzz is all about.

Star -powered panel: Jesse Thomas of Jess3.com, NASA’s Stephanie Schierholz, Miles O’Brien and Ariel Waldman have agreed to share the stage, if we get selected.

It’s all up to you to GIVE SPACE A CHANCE!

Space Buzz panel

Space Buzz panel

Let’s create some space buzzVote now…and tell all your friends.

Crosspost on GovLoop.com.


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Filed under Gov 2.0, NASA, social media, technology

RESPECT: Just a Little Bit!

Do you ever have those days, weeks, or months where life just gets you down? Too many projects to juggle. Too many battles too fight. Too many bills to pay. Not enough hours in the day.

Do you ever feel like this?

He looks how I feel sometimes...

My self-portrait!

The last few weeks have been rough. Getting my daughter Steph graduated and packed for Africa consumed much of my energy and emotion. I haven’t recharged yet. I can see it daily, as I allow typical bureaucratic in-fighting to get under my skin. Normally I’m more resilient. Now, I just feel flat.

Doing the right thing can be hard...I received lots of TWencouragement from tweeps. Like this tweet from Gordon Vaughn @aeroG of Houston, Texas:

Tweet: Doing right thing is about long-term perspective.What’s been really hard lately (for a career government employee who despises paperwork of any kind — except a paycheck, and those are electronic now) is putting in place legal documents to enable a 5-year exhibit contract, a never-been-done-before technology concept to capture innovative thought-processes, and partnerships to propel forward our next LAUNCH sustainability forum.

Bow Wave by artist Edouard Kamhi

Bow Wave by artist Edouard Kamhi

Think about a power boat slicing the water in forward progress. What’s left behind? A bow wave. The water has to go somewhere, and it’s powerful enough to swamp another boat.

If you travel through the air, you create a shock wave. The point is: with forward movement, you displace what was once there and shift it somewhere else.

It’s the same in the government. You can push forward and make significant progress, but at some point, the paperwork catches up with you. It’s simply a given…

The cost of doing business with the government: paperwork.

But in the midst of all the scrambling the past few weeks to make sure we document the cool things we’re doing at NASA, a colleague made this comment to me:

“What’s different about you, Beth, is that you respect the bureaucracy.”

Ok, I’ve got to admit. I was horrified. I abhor bureaucracy. It’s the bane of my existence. When I asked what she meant, she explained. Though I push the envelop and make people crazy with my new ideas, I respect that legal documents make everything work.

I had to admit. She’s right. What I’ve learned through 25 years getting smacked around by the goverment: the law is the law. We can argue interpretation of the law (and I’m pretty good at arguing for flexibility), but we need our lawyers to bless our forward progress.

If our lawyers are with us, who can be against us…if you know what I mean.

I learned something new about myself in the midst of this crazy, chaotic, bureaucratic nightmare I’m in the middle of:

I really DO respect the difference between doing my own thing, and doing the right thing. Hopefully, they’ll always be the same thing.

Where’s Aretha when I need her? I feel like singing...R.E.S.P.E.C.T…just a little bit…!

Crosspost on GovLoop.com.

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Filed under culture, federal government, Gov 2.0, leadership, NASA, social media

Space: @Astro_Wheels Point of View

Though many love to bash Twitter as meaningless chatter, I beg to differ. I think true character is revealed through a mere 140 characters — humor, anger, heart and soul. Meaningless chatter? Yes, that too. But I’m less inclined to follow a chatterhead…or TWatterhead, in Twitter-speak.

As an example of why Twitter matters, I want to introduce you to our new Twitternaut Doug Wheelock, better known as @Astro_Wheels to those of us in the Twittersphere. Doug just launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on June 15 with fellow NASA astronaut Shannon Walker and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin to join the rest of the Expedition 24 crew on the International Space Station. Doug will stay on Space Station as Expedition 25 Commander with the next crew change-out via Soyuz.

Note: Using the Soyuz spacecraft as our Space Station transport, we launch and land three crewmembers at a time. With six crew inhabiting our Station at any given time, each crewmember serves on two Expedition missions during their 5-6 month orbital assignment.

The Right StuffWith the ever popular @Astro_Soichi Noguchi leaving Station, we needed someone tweeting in space. Doug agreed. And I’m so glad he did. I’m thoroughly enjoying his point of view and feel he’s “The Right Stuff” for the job of communicating the amazing story of humanity’s journey to space and back.

Doug is a natural. He’s not only sharing pictures with us, but adding quite poignant commentary. We can share his journey together. Here is how it starts…and we’ve only just begun. He’ll be on orbit for the next five+ months.

Pre-flight

@Astro_Wheels Russian Sokol spacesuit. Astro_Wheels Expedition 24 Crewmates@Astro_Wheels posing next to Soyuz Hatch@Astro_Wheels takes Medal of Honor to orbit.@Astro_Wheels showing his Soyuz window seat.Soyuz spacecraft on the launchpadSoyuz spacecraft on the launch pad

On-Orbit

@Astro_Wheels Sunrise@Astro_Wheels Aurora@Astro_Wheels: Cyprus from Space Station@Astro_Wheels: Egypt from Space StationI’m really looking forward to learning more about astronaut Doug Wheelock through his 140 character tweets. I hope you’re following him. If you’re not, you should.

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Filed under astronaut, Earth, federal government, Gov 2.0, leadership, NASA, social media, space

Ideas on How to Open NASA? Spill!

Are you someone who knows exactly what it takes to make NASA the best agency possible? Do you doodle ideas on cocktail napkins and mail them to a NASA Center? Do you wake up early in the morning to watch Space Shuttle launches (like this morning’s 4:14 a.m. EST STS-130 launch) or stay up all night for mission coverage of Space Station? Do you wish you could wear a NASA badge and sit in a cubicle somewhere in the bureaucratic maze at a NASA installation?

Have we got a job for you!

Get your creative juices flowing. Capture all your ideas. We’re listening. You have until March 19, 2010 to share your ideas with us about how NASA can be more:

  1. Transparent,
  2. Participatory,
  3. Collaborative, and
  4. Innovative.
OpenGov NASA idea sharing site

OpenGov NASA idea sharing site

We’ve deployed a cool idea-sharing tool to let you give input, comment on input of others, and vote ideas up or down. Your ideas will feed into NASA’s Open Government Plan. You need an account first, but that’s as simple as adding your e-mail and a password.

Go ahead. Give it a try.

Submit an Idea

Submit an idea

And if you find any ideas by me in the system, feel free to give them a generous thumbs up!  (I’m just getting started….)

OpenGov/NASA idea

OpenGov/NASA innovation idea

OpenGov/NASA People's Choice Award

OpenGov/NASA People's Choice Award

“We are continually faced with a series of great opportunities brilliantly disguised as insoluble problems.” – John Gardner 1965

Let’s tackle those opportunities!

Crosspost on GovLoop and OpenNASA.

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Filed under federal government, Gov 2.0, NASA, OpenNASA, social media, space

Why Twitter? Why Now? Why Not?

I’m still processing conversations from the STS-129 Launch Tweet-Up at the Kennedy Space Center on Sunday and Monday. Because we spent launch day at the press site, I crossed paths with a number of veteran reporters and cameramen — yes, most were men.

They found it “amusing” — to say the least — that we wanted to host a group of “twits.” Ar Ar Ar Ar. Think loud belly laughs and shared nods. (A modern version of their reaction would be fist-bumps.) We prefer the word, tweeps, thank you.

Here’s one common question: “What can you possibly say in 140 characters?”

My answer: A few well chosen words speak volumes. What about:

I love you.

You’re fired.

Thank you.

You’re free to go.

I’m pregnant. (I’m not. Just so you know.)

Here are a few words I tweet often. Reality check on our industry. We’ve been reluctant to let others see us sweat. So. I like to remind the twitterverse:

Space is HARD! We make it look easy.

But noone can tweet it better than @Astro_Mike Massimino, who is eloquent in his 140 character essays on life in space.

@Astro_Mike's tweet from orbit

@Astro_Mike's tweet from orbit

My point is simply this: 140 characters, crafted thoughtfully, can be life-changing. We, in the government AND media, are wedded to our wordiness. (Just look at some of the titles on our business cards.) We ensure nothing is left open to interpretation. We want the “last word” to close out the argument.

Twitter invites a conversation. Free form. No boundaries.

Is free-flowing conversation a risk? Sure. Isn’t it always? But, I think we call that democracy. Right? Freedom of speech? Twitter simply makes it global. And how cool is that!

Follow the living, breathing NASA STS-129 Tweet-Up conversation.

BTW, you can help @Astro_Mike win TWEET of the YEAR for his first tweet from space in Mashable’s Open Web Awards. Vote & vote often!

Cross post on GovLoop.

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Filed under culture, federal government, Gov 2.0, leadership, NASA, social media, space, tweet-up

Twittersphere: Social Space Frontier

Non-twit-oholics always ask me, “What’s the point? Why Twitter?”

I’m sorry. That’s like asking me, “Why chocolate?”

My answer, “Take the first bite, then we’ll talk.”

But, some still need convincing. I mean really. You know those types. The ones who look at the chocolate cheesecake with swirls of whipped cream…and walk away. Yeah, those guys. They need a bit more convincing.

If you’re one of them, here ya’ go. Maybe you’ll see what NASA sees out in the social space frontier. Feel free to join us there.

Social media offers new ways for NASA to interact with non-traditional audiences in a dynamic, viral conversation about space, the merits of exploring the unknown, and its relevance to every day life here on our home planet. For the first time, citizens of this planet can talk to scientists, engineers, policy-makers, and space travelers.

Of all the new media tools available to us, Twitter offers the most intimate, immediate 24/7 access through mobile devices, laptops, and/or traditional keyboard access.

In 140 characters or less, breaking space news pings around the world and back again.

STS-125, the Space Shuttle mission to repair Hubble, marked the first NASA mission where we actively engaged global citizens through social media – Twitter, blogs, Facebook.

Mike @Astro_Mike Massimino became the first astronaut to use twitter before, during, and after his mission.

In four short months, he broke one million followers — making him a Massimillionaire! His willingness to tweet during the complex Hubble repair mission captivated media and non-media alike, and propelled @Astro-Mike to superstardom.

Name of the game: access. Through @Astro_Mike, NASA granted outsiders access into an elite insider circle.

Twitter offers us a simple new tool to help make space popular within the non-space crowd, and see traction on our goal to elevate “space” within pop culture. One measure of success: Twitter featured @Astro_Mike as one of Twitter’s top accounts on their front page, along with the likes of Hollywood’s Ashton @aplusk Kutcher who tops 3.9 million followers now.

NASA made it to Twitter’s Top 10 trending topics a number of times during the mission, and in subsequent missions. For the social media generation, @Astro_Mike gained hero-status akin to John Glenn or Neil Armstrong of the “Right Stuff” generation. Now others at NASA have followed his footsteps into the Twittersphere.

And you can too.

Here’s a list of current Astronaut Twitter Accounts (in no particular order): @NASA_Astronauts 10,238 followers

@StationCDRKelly: Scott Kelly 1,973

@ShuttleCDRKelly: Mark Kelly 1,844

@Astro_Jeff – Jeff Williams 3,447

@Astro_Nicole – Nicole Stott 6,253

@Astro_Sandy – Sandy Magnus 3,769 (no longer active)

@Astro_Jose – Jose Hernandez 59,241

@Astro_Tim – Tim Kopra 8,720

@Astro_Mike – Mike Massimino 1,157,551

@Astro_127 – Mark Polansky 40,581 (no longer active)

@Astro_Bones – Bobbie Satcher 1,761

@Astro_Flow – Leland Melvin 992

@CFugelsang – ESA/Christer Fuglesang 3,905

@Astro_RonRon Garan 1,197

@Astro_Soichi – JAXA/Soichi Noguchi 677

@Astro_TJ – TJ Creamer 58

STS-129 Mission will blast off the planet on Monday, November 16 with Twitternauts @Astro_Bones and @Astro_Flow. PLUS, we’re hosting our first Launch Tweet-Up at the Kennedy Space Center. More updates as time allows.

Learn more about the mission and NASA. You can fan UP on NASA’s facebook too.

Cross post on GovLoop.

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Filed under federal government, Gov 2.0, govloop, leadership, NASA, social media, space, tweet-up

Social Media Awards: My Picks

Mashable.com is hosting the 3rd Annual Open Web Awards Social Media Edition. Pete Cashmore set up awards that ensure we keep the buzz going linking back to his site. Brilliant! We can nominate our favorites in multiple social media-related categories.

The catch: we nominate once a day in each of the 50 categories through November 15th…AND only the top five nominations in each category move forward to the voting round.

Basically, the nomination period is a semi-final round. Mashable ensures users return to his site day after day, and tweet their results. Great PR for Mashable. He’s creating a social media frenzy by rewarding the social media frenzy. Like I said, brilliant.

Gotta’ love Pete. Wish we had him on our team!

With the few days left for nominations, I thought I’d share a couple of NASA-related choices (plus one or two).

Here are my nominations:

Tweet of the Year:

Tweet from Space by Tw-astronaut @Astro_Mike Massimino.

STS-125: First ever tweet from space

STS-125: First ever tweet from space

Funniest Tweet:

Tweet about life after space by @Astro_Mike.

Life After Space

Gravity Reality: Life AFTER Space

Twitter User of the Year: @Astro_Mike — over 1 million followers!

Most Inspiring to Follow: @Astro_Mike.

Best Brand Use of Twitter: NASA.

Best Brand Use of Facebook: NASA.

Best Brand Use of YouTube: NASA YouTube.

Best Flickr Photographer: NASA’s Bill Ingalls

Best Online Video Web Series: Mike Massimino’s “NASA Behind Scenes” series.

Best Non-Profit Use of Social Media: NASASpace Tweep Society + OpenNASA.

TwitPic of the Year: French Photographer Thierry LeGault’s spectacular shot of the STS-125 Hubble repair mission in front of the Sun. (FYI: NASA provided the camera to enable Thierry to capture this image.)

Thierry LeGault's image of STS-125 mission

Thierry LeGault's image of STS-125 mission

Best Musical Artist to Follow: Tom Fletcher of McFly

I know you’re thinking the last one doesn’t fit under the space theme. Think again. (See previous posts.)

Call to ACTION: You only have a few days left to give space a chance in the universe of social media. Make your voice count.

Crosspost on OpenNASA.

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Filed under Gov 2.0, NASA, OpenNASA, social media, space

Telework: Lovefest!

Yesterday, I worked from home — my day to take part in NASA’s scheduled emergency procedure exercise. Thanks EVA.com for posting a feature about it. We’re testing to see if we crash our systems with all of us logging on remotely. After enduring the nightmare traffic commutes following the 9/11 attack on the Pentagon, I began to wonder why we couldn’t simply work from home on days of horrific traffic or bad weather. I’m glad we’re testing it out, office by office.

We have the technology to work from space on a daily basis with our six international crew members. Why not model it here on Earth?

"Space: Ultimate Telework" by NASA Cartoonist Jim @JimEHull

"Space: Ultimate Telework" by NASA Cartoonist Jim @JimEHull

Think about the impact on our planet if fewer of us hit the roads every day to go sit at a desk. I’m specifically talking office work. Landscapers would clearly need to show up at the worksite — that is, until we have little landscape-robots that can plant via remote directions, like we use with NASA’s Robonaut. Even doctors can practice medicine remotely through technology. We demonstrate that daily on our orbiting outpost, Space Station, as well.

We can debate the merits of telework. I’d really rather just share a list of what I LOVE about working from home. I’m sure you have your own pro/con list.

I have to admit, though, the only downside to telework in my opinion: not ENOUGH opportunities to work from home!

Reasons I LOVE  teleworking:

#1 Commute = 20 steps to my computer. No traffic. ‘Nuff said!

#2 Comfy clothes. PJs, if I want. Ah the luxury of NOT getting dressed for work — no makeup, no flat iron. I can EVEN save the PLANET by NOT wasting water on a shower. And NO office mates close enough to me to complain. 😀

#3 Windows in EVERY room!!!!! Woo Hoo! I can see green everywhere I look. (Green as in grass, not money.) But then again, I AM saving gas money. See #8 below.

View from my Executive Office Suite

View from my Executive Office Suite

#4 Silence…other than the birds chirping outside. Concentrating in a cubicle environment can be difficult. I get where the cubicle concept came from. Someone somewhere wanted to ensure office workers shared information with one another. The answer: create a maze-like office environment with walls that offer visual privacy but stereo sound. Every conversation can be heard by everyone. Office mates talk through the cubicle walls, without knowing if anyone is listening. Let’s not even touch the subject of coughing and sneezing in a cubicle environment….

My office garden at home.

My office garden at home.

#5 Brightly-colored walls, if I stay inside. My office is painted Garden Green. My daughters will attest to the fact that I can hardly STAND to be indoors. When I’m inside, I surround myself with Spring colors all year round. I really think that’s the hardest part about working inside the padded gray walls of my office cube. Note: I always wanted to create a musical theater production called, “Inside My Padded Cell.” Hey, if Phantom of the Opera can have a musical, so can a crazy government employee trapped inside cubicle walls day in and day out. Right? 😉

#6 Vitamin D (as in good ole’ sunshine) — only a few steps from my computer. I can even take my laptop outside if the weather is nice. Most days in the office, I never see the light of day — literally. During the winter, I drive to work in the dark, park in the garage, take the elevator up to our floor, work, take the elevator back down to the garage, and drive home in the dark. Unless I make a trip across the street to Starbucks, I may never get out of the building. Real Vitamin D from the sun is SO much more satisfying than taking a Vitamin D horse pill.

Coco all snuggled up next to my office chair.

Coco all snuggled up next to my office chair.

#7 Creature Comforts. All the critters hang out at my house. My cat Coconut (Coco for short) prefers my lap, but moves to her window bed if my lap is taken (laptop).  Longtime chipmunk neighbor, Chippy Stumptail, lives under my kitchen window and hangs out on my porch steps. He lost half his tail years ago, but I’m happy to report it’s growing back — almost 1/2 inch of it. All kinds of birds — finches, woodpeckers and at least one hawk — swoop around in my yard. Sometimes hummingbirds, too.

#8 Cost savings. I save TONS of money when I’m not running down to the deli in our building for snacks or lunch. Supply and demand forces RULE. The demand outweighs the supply and we pay a high price for it. Yes, I know, I can bring my lunch to save money. But how much nicer to make my lunch at home while I’m teleworking. (Ok, I’m sure my water bill and electricity go up from working at home…but somehow the price of gas and cost for food seems higher.)

#9 Decreased stress. Speaks for itself, I think.

#10 Increased productivity. I need quiet to write. My home office TOTally fits the bill. I get TONS done at home. See #4 Silence.

Bravo NASA for making sure every Headquarters employee has the equipment and understanding of how to work from home in case we have an emergency in the area.

Hands up for all those who want to “test it out” on a more regular basis. Yes, I see yours. And yours too. 😉

My buddy Jim Hull sent me this today. He SO nailed it!

Illustration by NASA's resident cartoonist Jim Hull.

Illustration by NASA's resident cartoonist Jim Hull.

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